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Henry M Zollinger and Eliza Annie Stirland Life History Part 3

Man of Action

“Henry, a man of action, has rendered much valuable service to his community and church throughout his life. Learned the nobility of work early in life, he assisted his parents with the various farm activities and was a hard worker when he began to till his own acres” (Providence and Her People)

Farming was no easy way of making a living. The children were part of the plan. Beets needed to be thinned, backs ached, going down those long rows cutting out the beets and leaving only one. Then the weeds would spring up, and hoeing was just as hard and all out in the hot sun. In our family Ora was the task-master. She cross hoed and we crawled behind and did the thinning. At the end of the long rows, we had only 2 minutes to rest and again we had to begin. Pulling weeds was the next process until harvest time when we dug and topped the beets, threw them in piles and then onto the truck or wagon to haul the beets to the beet factory. Sometimes the beet tops were covered with frost or even snow.

The hay or alfalfa was cut when ready. The children shocked the hay then we pitched it on wagons, some of the children had to tramp the hay down so we could get more hay on the wagons and then haul the hay to the barn. Riding the derrick horse was no fun when the fork was tipped the horse jerked and it was scary. The cable was drawn back, the horse backs up and we listen to “Ready” and we pulled another heavy fork full on the cable into the barn.

Milking cows had to be done every morning and every night. The cows had to be herded from the pasture to their stall in the barn, fed, and were cleaned off and ready to be milked, either by hand or machine. Either way, it was a chore not too desirable for the children, but it had to be done and it was done – not too much time for grumbling- Obedience was learned and taught! Children learned to work and enjoyed the gratification of a job well done.

The chicken coup had to be cleaned out, not the most gracious job. We all took our turn. The eggs were gathered, cleaned and cased. The egg money was our lunch money, our groceries and household accessories. Lyman records: ” Money was hard to come by. Dad and mother always had a vegetable garden and we wouldn’t have to buy many things from the store. Our milk check was $18.00 for 2 cans of milk for 2 weeks, eggs were $0.10 per dozen, $3.00 for a case of 30 dozen. We churned all of our own butter. We would go to the store and buy a few extras. We would take wheat to the mill and get our flour and cereal. Mother sewed many clothes for us.”

Though farming took work from early morning to late at night, Henry served in many community projects as well as church responsibilities even as Bishop for several years. The question is often asked, “How did he do it?”  His father did. They knew how to prioritize and to progress. They seemed to be proficient in putting first things first, their households were well organized, neat, clean, and the children well kept. High standards of honesty, industry, integrity, and prayer with faith and testimony was taught by example.

When the children married and left home, Henry retired and sold the farms. Their home was never vacant. During the close of the World War II they offered to house four GI students. Breakfast and supper were also provided. One, a Catholic, one not a religions committed, 2 LDS not too active. The supper meal was always a time for an hour of chatting, invariably ending in a gospel discussion. As a result of the year’s experience the 2 LDS students left for missions. Grandchildren were commonly staying at the Zollinger home and going to college at UtahState. Henry and Eliza kept up with the latest generation. They didn’t have time to grow old. The flower garden provided enough care to keep them strong and busy. An article is provided to capture the story:

In 1959 the Herald Journal ran an article called Today’s Valentine. Today’s Valentine, 9, July 1959. “A long overdo valentine today to a man who keeps one of the most beautiful gardens and landscaped yards in the State. He is H.M. Zollinger of Providence, Utah. I had occasion to drive past Mr. Zollinger’s residence a short time ago, and the blooming shrubs and blossoming plants were startling in their beauty. A retired farmer, gardener Zollinger, now 77, spends a good many hours making his yard a thing of beauty. A friend reports that Mr. Zollinger has taken special pains to “schedule” his gardening, planting flowers designed to bloom from the start of the growing season until the very end, a fine citizen, a top-flight gardener – and a Valentine to you sir.”

Also in 1959, Henry being 78 years old, the Herald Journal printed a picture of Henry and his grandson Brent hauling the last load hay with wagon and a team of horses. The commentary states:

“Less frequent sight in today’s farming operations is that of a man and a boy, a load of hay, with a wagon drawn by horses. H.M. Zollinger of Providence still enjoys driving a team even if it does seem out of the posh and tractors continue to increase.

“Now retired and a little lost after spending a lifetime farming is a prominent Providence cattle and dairy man.

“Until the age of 75 Mr. Zollinger did his own farm work and did it without the aid of modern farming machinery.

“Today he busies himself gardening and finds a great deal of satisfaction comes from keeping his lovely yard in tip-top condition. Flowers of many varieties are found at the immaculate Zollinger residence and his gardens are planned so that some are in bloom from the beginning to the end of the season.

“Mr. Zollinger also finds more time now for reading a worthwhile pastime which he never had quite enough time for before.

“Mr. Zollinger believes that hard work more than any thing else keeps a man from looking and feeling old. He also credits his 37 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren for keeping him and his wife young at heart.”  The article mentioned his church and community activities as has been stated.

Henry spent his last retiring years working in the Logan Temple. This was a great challenge for him because of his loss in hearing and he felt he was “just too old”. His determination and courage to do good was so well tutored by his father as an example kept him going until his health inhibited his services.

“Henry died at the home of his son Lyman in Tremonton, Utah, on Monday, Christmas day, Dec. 25, 1967 at 11:30 P.M. at the age of 86. In the last few weeks before his death he was a model patient. It was a privilege to shower him with love and kindness, because he was so appreciative of every small thing done for him. Even toward the end he never failed to come up with the dry wit by which he was known.”

With his passing only his brother, Lawrence Zollinger, of Providence, Utah, and his sister, Mary Luthi of Freedom, Wyoming, remained of the original 13 children of Jacob and Rosetta Zollinger

In addition to their children, Ora, Lyman, Ray, Blanche, Fern, Dean and Clayne, there were 37 grandchildren at the time of Henry’s death.

His funeral was held at the Providence 2nd ward chapel that he helped to build, Thursday, Dec. 28, 1967. His funeral was akin to our precious “family gatherings” as grandpa Jacob called them. The children and grandchildren performed with remarks from President Hall, Bishop Olsen and his brother Lawrence Zollinger. The interment was in the Providence Cemetery.

One remark from President Hall has languished on in the memory of the compilor, Blanche, he said, “Mr. Zollinger was a righteous man. The Lord has said that he favors the righteous and that a righteous man will inherit Eternal Life. Henry’s celestial glory was attained by him fulfilling the measure of his creation.

Henry and Eliza were always proud to be citizens of Providence, UT.  Over a period of several year, Eliza worked with the city mayors and councilmen to purchase the land bordering 100 North  West of 200 West for a city park.  This finally happened in 1985.  A beautiful park has been built which has served the community as the primary park in the city.  Along with ball fields, 2 covered meeting areas, a playground, tennis courts and a veterans memorial have been built.  The park is a welcome sight to all those who enter into Providence from Logan’s South Main Street.  Below is a copy of the Resolution drawn up by the city designating the land as a city park, together with a rose garden to be known as Eliza’s Rose garden.  The rose garden was later replaced with a war memorial.

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Henry M Zollinger and Eliza Annie Stirland Life History Part 2

Mission

The missionary program was vital in the restoration of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Books are replete with inspiring experiences of those who sacrificed in extreme conditions to meet these callings. The church grew in strength and power as well as those who labored. It is most astonishing how the Lord blessed the families left at home, even though they were not without trials and challenges to their “wits end”. It was not uncommon for husbands to be called and leaving a wife and children. Even so it was with Henry and Eliza and their three small children.

Joseph Campbell Sr. called Henry on his first mission in the spring of 1916. He went to the bishop and asked for an extension to prepare his household which took the rest of the summer. His mission was the Central States where he labored mostly in Dallas, Texas.

“Lyman was 4 years old when Dad left and remembers Dad calling his little family, Ora was 6 years and Ray was around 2 years, and having family prayer and walking down the railroad track (in front of the house) to the railroad station, just one block away, leaving mother with tears streaming down her cheeks.  Dad left mother with 6 cows to milk, feed and take care of, cleaning out the stable and the other chores.” Eliza’s shoulders were broad, her faith strong and she could handle the task- and do it well!

Following are excerpts from letters from Henry:

22 Jan. 1916, Dallas, Texas, “Left by train 10 Jan. 1916, for the Central States Mission. I went straight to Independence and was sent to Kansas. I was frightened to death. The country was different and I had to travel alone. I prayed many times that I could change trains all right and when I go to the large depot, I was so bewildered I did not know what to do, but finally after praying I got on the right train. I met a josephite on the train and we had a real heated discussion, so he got mad at me when I dug at him about his church and he left me. He knew I was green and I really was, but I tried. I got a little mad and come near slapping him in the mouth. Well, I landed in Texas in a city of Dallas. It was about 100,000 people and I went to the office. They told me to go to the hotel and get a room and they would send the Elders to find me. It might take three or four days and I was already so homesick. They came the next day and you can imagine it felt just like two angels dropped from heaven. The weather is so changeable, some days it is hot and it can change so suddenly to cold. The first day we went out and held a street meeting. It was a great experience to me. Well, Mama, (Eliza) I will have to ask you for some money, I have had heavy expenses to get started. Could you send me $10.00?”

And the last letter he wrote from the mission field:

“The conditions these people are in, a large family and no room and dirty, there is no name for it. The house no more than a shell… took rags and poked in the cracks to keep out the cold and wind… not even a rug on the floor and talk about the noise all day … She needs good attention now. We hated to leave them in that condition but our time was limited and there was such a large crowd. The neighbors were glad to sit with them at night. They placed the whole responsibility on us while we were there. Sister Ennis would have nobody else wait on the girl only I when she slept, the first couple of nights. So I got a little experience in Typhoid Fever, and believe me I often thought of the time you had it one winter when you told me about it. It certainly is an awful disease. Well, I am very grateful for the healing powers that has made its appearance in the ministry. I have a bad cold and my fingers and ears are a little sore yet but they are getting better. The children I guess still talk about their Pa, when he is coming home. I have dreamed the last few nights about you at home. The worst of it all is that little Ray would not have anything to do with his Pa. Yours ever & ever, President H. M. Z.”

A terrible flu epidemic swept the nation and Rosetta Zollinger was one of the victims. Henry received word of the death of his mother (Jan. 31, 1918) and was released from his mission. He returned home in time for the funeral (Feb. 7, 1918) which he attended, but he was so ill with typhoid fever that he did not go to the cemetery, but went instead to his bed. It was late spring before he was finally well again.

Henry grew in testimony, knowledge and stature during his missionary labors. He served as president of the branch and leader soon after his arrival.

The Lord knew in calling him to the mission field would prepare him while he was teaching and converting others the Lord would be fine-tuning Elder Zollinger for his mortal mission on this earth. Even the death of his beloved mother was necessary in preserving Henry’s life, as has been stated – His health was in jeopardy as he left the mission field.

Spiritual Experience

“About six miles west of Logan and just north of the Mendon Road I had rented forty acres of meadow hay land, I was moving a hay derrick under an electric power line to my property on the other side of the Mendon Road when the cable on the small end of the long derrick pole came in contact with a live electric wire. As a consequence, I received a shock which threw me to the ground and before the two teams of horses were stopped I was pinned under the frame of the derrick until help came. The boys who were with me were Henry Merchant, a hired man, LeGrande Stirland, a brother-in-law and my two older boys, Lyman and Ray. They all said I was dead. LeGrande took the boys away from the terrible scene while the Merchant boy, went to the nearest house to telephone for a doctor and for help. I lay there about an hour before the Doctors, Eliason and Wallace Budge came. They at once lifted me out from under the derrick and took me to the UtahIdahoHospital in Logan, which is now the L.D.S.Hospital.

“After LeGrande had the children quieted down a little and before the doctors had arrived, he said he saw me breath and then he took my hat to the creek and brought some water and put it on my face and hands. While my body was under the derrick and they thought me dead, I had an experience in the Spirit World which I which to relate.

“My spirit left my body and I could see it lying under the derrick frame and at that moment my guardian angel, my mother who had died in January 1918 and my sister, Annie, who had died in infancy, were beside me. I saw that Annie’s spirit was full grown in statue and also seemed very intelligent. We then visited many of the people whom my father had done the vicarious work for and although some still remained dormant, my mother hoped they would soon obey the gospel. She then warned me to be very careful and keep the faith. She also told me to warn my brothers and sisters to live more closely to the gospel and not let worldly things lead them astray as that was the way the Nephites of old were led away.

“My mother then introduced me to the heads of five generations of my father’s people, all of whom were in the gospel. I noticed that people had their free agency there like we do here and that by gaining knowledge was the only way to progression. My mother informed me that my father would receive another large record of our dead kindred. Also at the death of my father, my brother would have the privilege of being in charge of the records.

“My guide then showed me the spirits of the children that would yet come to my family if we would be faithful. They were full grown but not in the same sphere as those who had lived upon the earth. I could see many of the spirits that had been refused the privilege of having a body. There was much sorrow.

“We then had the privilege of visiting my brothers-in-law who had died. William who had been on a mission in Australia, told me he was presiding over a large mission and was very happy in his labors and to tell his parents and his people not to mourn about him as he was losing nothing but doing much good. We next went to see his older brother John. I found him discussing the gospel to a large congregation, bearing a strong testimony to them. When he got through he told me he was very happy in his labors and had no regrets that he was there and to tell his people not to mourn.

“My guide made known to me that my brother Oliver and two brother-in-laws would go on missions, Christian, not for some time and Byron would be called among the Indians and would perform a wonderful mission among the people.

“Then as we were coming back, I saw a man who had been a Cambelite Minister down in Texas when I was upon my mission there three years ago. He was a great friend to us and had opened his house many times for us to preach in. He had died while I was still in the mission field. He asked me if I could do the work in the temple that was necessary for his salvation. I told him I would and he seemed pleased. I then met a man whom I had never seen before. His wife had come into the church and was baptized after he had died. She spoke to me while I was on my mission in regard to having the work done for him in the temple. As she had already spoken to other Elders about it, I thought it was already done but the man told me it was not yet  done and was anxious that it be taken care of. I told him I would see to it. Then my guide told me that Thomas Stirland would get a record of his dead relations. I then returned to my body and I understood all the time I was away from it that I would return to it as my guide had told me in the beginning.”

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Henry M Zollinger and Eliza Annie Stirland Life History Part 1

I was sent a copy of the life history of one of my ancestors recently so I will include it here for all to read.  Henry is the 6th child and 5th son of Jacob Zollinger and Rosetta Loosli.  Henry’s wife Eliza Annie is the eldest of 12 children born to Thomas Stirland and Rosina Schenk.

A Brief History of Henry Moroni Zollinger

Heritage

Henry Moroni Zollinger was born of goodly parents and grandparents. His grandparents were Johannes and Elizabeth Usteri of Udorf, Zurich, Switzerland. Johannes born June 1795 – 15 February 1875, was converted and baptized in Zurich in 1861. He was the “standard bearer” of the Zollinger family. Withstanding severe opposition, his enthusiasm and faith never faltered. He married Elizabeth Usteri, born in Zurich, 4 July 1809. She came from a long line of prominent people: ministers, college professors and city officials including mayors. Their family included: Ferdinand Johann, Anna, Johannes, Ann Barbara, Elizabeth, Dorothea and Jacob.

Jacob Zollinger, born 3 July 1845 – 11 July 1942, lived and experienced more of the progress of Providence Cache County than did any other of the pioneers of the community, living there continuously for 80 years, lacking only four months. He left Switzerland late in November 1862 at age 17 years and died in Logan, Utah at age 97 plus eight days.

Jacob was baptized with his family 1 May 1862 in Zurich, and left with his father’s family later that day. Because the other members of his family were ill with mountain fever, Jacob drove three yokes of oxen across the plains.

Jacob married Rosetta Loosli in the Endowment House in SaltLake 9 May 1870. Rosetta was the daughter of Ulrich Loosli and Magalena Aeschimann who was also born in Switzerland 16 June 1851. Her family also came to Utah, 1860, after she was baptized 21 October 1860.

Rosetta was a hard worker, spinning and weaving, sewing clothes for her family. She kept a beautiful flower garden as well as a bountiful vegetable garden. She was a tireless worker in the church as well as maintaining an orderly home for their 12 children.

Jacob was known as a hard worker as well. His labor was not only in working with the soil as a successful farmer, but those efforts extended in helping to build meeting houses, tabernacles, temples, schoolhouses, irrigation canals and roads. He assisted in building the road beds for the Central and the Union Pacific railroads. In his retired years he continues his daily activities in genealogy and extending his line and the lines of his two wives. His daily morning routine found him trodding up the temple hill to perform ordinances. His vehement desire never ceased to continue his responsibilities to those beyond the veil.

Jacob and Rosetta’s family consisted of 13 children: Jacob, John, William, Joseph, Henry, Aaron, Oliver, Lawrence, Mary, Rose, Anna, Evelyn, and Geneva. Seven sons and one daughter besides their father fulfilled full-time missions for the church. As the old saying goes, ” he is a chip off the old block.” The life of Henry mirrors his great and illustrious parentage.

Henry Moroni Zollinger

Henry Moroni Zollinger was born October 6, 1881, at Providence, Utah. He was the sixth child and the fifth son of Jacob and Rosetta Loosli Zollinger. He was baptized by John Heyrand on October 6, 1889. He was ordained an Elder by Lorenzo C. Tibbetts February 21, 1916.

Henry’s father, Jacob Zollinger, recorded the following: “When our son, Henry was four or five he became very sick with typhoid fever. As his condition improved he was left with his sister, Rose, but somehow he managed to get out of the house and his condition became worse than before. It seemed nothing but the power of the Lord could help him. That morning I began to fast and pray for him. I administered to him and prayed in secret almost every minute of the day. That evening he was on the road to recovery. We were thankful to the Lord for his life for we knew that it was through the power of God that his life was spared.”

As a youth, and indeed throughout his life Henry loved to tease. One Halloween he and some of his friends, namely Guy and Wallace Fife, donned sheets, and hid in the trees lining the road between River Heights and Providence. When a wagon loaded with hay and pulled by a team of horses came along the road they jumped out from the trees one by one spooking the horses which bolted down the road sending hay and wagon ever which way!

Henry attended school to the eighth grade. His education did not end there. He was an avid reader and learned mechanics in fixing machinery used on the farm. He was an adventurer and tried new ways of improving a situation. He was a “fun guy” to be around.

Marriage

Henry married Eliza Annie Stirland, of Providence, Utah, on February 23, 1910, in the Logan, Utah temple and were married by William Budge. They were endowed and sealed on this day. Their transportation was a team of horses and sleigh.

At the time of the announcement of their marriage Eliza Stirland, the eldest daughter of Thomas Stirland, was no unnoticed young lady in the ward. Besides her responsibilities as a teacher of a young age, her responsibilities in helping support her eleven brothers and sisters warranted the expression, “she was her father’s pride and joy.” Then her decision caused some heart-felt concerns to this Thomas Stirland, a true Englishman. Henry, of Swiss heritage and a farmer was of another culture. Thomas Stirland’s reply was: ” my dear, couldn’t you do a little better than to marry a Zollinger?” Coincidentally, when Henry made his announcement to Jacob Zollinger, Jacob hesitantly asked; ” couldn’t you do a little better than marrying a Stirland?” Their choices were supernal! Seven valiant spirits were waiting to come to their humble home; namely: Lyman Moroni, Ray Dimond, Dean Calvert, Clayne Stirland, Ora, Blanche and Fern.

After the wedding Henry and Eliza made their home with the Zollingers until Jacob helped them in moving into a two room house. This same house was remodeled about 5 years later, with an inside bathroom and a porch and two bedrooms with an upstairs. In 1929, the family’s addition of seven children necessitated another remodeling. Fred Blauser was the contractor and the lovely spacious home still stands as a monument of precious memories.

Jacob helped Henry and Eliza in renting 60 acres of land in College Ward, six miles from Providence. Henry paid for the land as well as 50 acres called the Rice property, and then later added 120 acres more. This distance by horses and also walking , herding cattle and cows was routine for the children as they grew up. Model T Fords replaced the horses and made the traveling even fun.

Regarding the acreage: Through the years Henry bought land around the home in parcels of 4 acres, 3 acres, 9 acres and another 3 acres. Then extended his farming to include 26 acres in RiverHeights. His total land acreage was at home 19 acres, River Heights 26 acres, College Ward 230 acres, totaling 275 acres. He raised grain,, sugar beets, alfalfa, pasture and fall wheat.

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Jacob Zollinger Life History Part 1

I was given a binder of information from my mother’s side of the family and in this binder I found a very valuable and precious life history.  I loved reading it so I want to share it with all of you.  I scanned it and converted it to text so that it could be searched.  I have pages 9-22 so there may be more out there that I don’t have.  I will publish it in parts to keep it at a manageable reading length.  Enjoy!

Origin of the Zollinger name

The Von Zollikon of Lutikon owned many Large possessions which in 1488, fell into the hands of an old woman. She made a dona­tion of goods to the church of Hombrechtikon for the salvation of her soul. The many who had been living on these estates then became rentors and not owners as before, having to pay fees to the church. In 1432, Johns de Zollikon de Gruningen, had many possessions in Itzikon near Gruningen and a cousin, Johannes de Zollikon de Lutikin, in 467, lived on the farms in Lutikon.

 Later the name changed and the noble (Von de) disappeared. The following surnames then came into use in the 15th cen­ary: Zollicon, Zollingcon, Zolliker, Zoll­yker, Zolligker, Zolliger and Zollinger. Here in Lutikon, my llth great grandfather was born in 1486 and in 1500 the surname Zollinger was found in Hombrechtikon, the birth place of my 9th great grandfather, Jacob Zollinger, in 1540.

 No mention is made of nobility, knight-food or noblemen after 1268. “However, the -record states that a Herman Von Zollikon, citizen of Gruningen, possessing a large area of the hills of Zollikon then called Zollikerberg, sells this forest area to the monastery of Oetenbach in 1449.

 In 1408, the town of Gruningen became, by purchase, a part of Zurich, the people became ordinary citizens and there were no more Von Zollikon in Gruningen after that. That is to say, nobility passes andthe name changed. The noble (Von de), meaning the noblemen of the housed Zollikon, disappear.”

In his book, ” A Guide To Genealogical Research,” Archibald F. Bennett indicates that the surnames now in use were derived from five different sources: 1. Patronymics or Sire names, 2. Place or locality names, 3. Occupation, trade or professional names, 4. Descriptive or nick names, 5. Names of animals and natural objects.

In our historywe have an example of a locality name. The name Usteri was taken from the town of Uster. The oldest ancestor of Elizabetha Usteri, my great grandmother, was Hans Von Usteri, born in Uster about 1460. After he had moved to Zurich the people called him Hans of Uster. He took the name of Usteri from the town of Uster where the family originally came from.

The following are surnames of people of Swiss descent, living today, whose surnames were derived from one or another sourcethat is mentioned above:

Fuhriman – teamster                        Schmidt-blacksmith

Kaufman – salesman                         Kuhfuss – cow foot

Hauptman – headman                         Spuhler – Singer

Schiess – sharp-shooter                    Ech – corner

Rinderknecht – cow servant                 Vogal – bird

Stauffer – a steep place on the mountain        Niederhauser – of the lower houses

Hockstrasser – an elevated place

Theurer – expensive article

Baumgardner – tree gardner

My progenitors,from my llth great grand­father, who was born in Lutikon, Zurich, Switzerland, down to my great grandparents, Johannes and Elisabetha Usteri Zollinger, are a matter of record on proven pedigrees and on family group records. Johannes and Elisabetha were the parents of seven children, Jacob Zollinger, my grandfather, being the youngest.

In the history which follows, given by my grandfather, Jacob Zollinger,then in his ninetieth year, I have made some insertions such as dates, names of individuals and places not before mentioned. I have also, when I thought necessary, altered his word­ing to give better connotation. In doing so I have exercised the greatest of care to con­vey the meaning intended. Other facts and experiences remembered by his son, Lawrence D. Zollinger, are also added. Every effort has been made to present exact historical information and wherever possible the words of grandfather, Jacob Zollinger, are quoted as they came from him. They will be found set apart in quotation marks.

MY GRANDFATHER NOW TELLS HIS OWN STORY

My parents, Johannes and Elisabetha Usteri, were a very religious people. My mother came through a line of very prominent people who lived in the town of Zurich for 400 years. Three of her ancestors were ministers of the gospel, four were professors of theology and five were university pro­fessors. Other relatives were merchants, members of the city council, millers, doctors captains and a poet. My grandmother was a very prayerful woman and every time she came to see us she always told my mother to always attend to her prayers.

My early life on the farm

IN URDORF ZURICH, SWITZERLAND

My parents taught us children to work and to be obedient. We had to go to school five and one half days a week and also had to take some lessons from the minister that didn’t interest me at all. In my early youth I had little time to play as I always had to help at home. At the age of twelve I attended school only one day a week and spent two hours with the minister and the rest of the week was spent helping my father on the farm milking cows, feeding cattle and other work that a boy of my age could do. My father kept cows because they were the most profit­able animals. With them he did all the work on the farm as well as selling the milk which they produced.

At the death of my grandfather, Heinrich Zollinger, my father inherited part of his father’s farm, Then he purchased two thirds of the Zollinger home which was at this time more than one hundred years old. We shared our large house in Urdorf with my sister’s family. The other half was occupied by our cousin and her family. The church and the cemetery were just over the wall from our house. I remember there were two large walnut trees growing in the corner of the church yard. Buried in this area were all the suicides. On the west side of the wall was a row of prune trees. My chums and I would pick up the ripe fruit on our side of the wall but were afraid to get the fruit on the other side.

My father bought more land and from his farm he sold cattle, grain, potatoes, peas, prunes and apples. From a grape vineyard located on a sunny slope, which produced excellent quality grapes, we made and sold wine. The produce from the farm, at first, had to be transported to market, a distance of six miles, by father and the older girls, on their heads.

My mother thinking there wasn’t enough money coming in, began weaving silk for a large firm in Zurich. The girls were also taught to weave and there were also some men who kept the looms in good repair. As a

rule no one outside of the city was allowed to do this kind of work, but as no one ob­jected, the business became a profitable one. The woven silk material was sold in 35 yard lengths.

A LESSON IN OBEDIENCE

One of the things I liked to do was to go swimming on Sundays with my chums.  On one particular Sunday, as soon as the preacher said amen, out the door we went to the river near by to swim. This was of course against the wishes of my mother. She was always quite strict with me and had told me to stay home that Sunday. When we boys were prepar­ing to leave the swimming hole a group of younger boys came to swim. One of these boys, a cousin of mine then eleven years old, also had the name of Jacob Zollinger. He got too far down in a whirlpool and was drowned. When the news of his death reached the near­by town of Dietikon by the river, my parents who happened to be there on business, think­ing it was I, became very much alarmed. As you may guess they thought it was I who was drowned. However, they were very much re-leaved upon returning home to find me safe and sound. I got a good slapping from my mother.

 AN OLD FASHIONED WEDDING November 30, 1856

Not everyone could afford a wedding wit all the old fashioned customs.  When my eldest sister, Anna, was married to Hans Ulrich Haederli, they put in their order to the cabinet maker to have him make them a wardrobe, bedstead, chairs and table. They then engaged the miller who had four fine horses to go after their furniture. On the way back the wardrobe fell off and was broken. The cabinet maker who was along went back and took his wife’s wardrobe to replace the one broken. Anna Barbara, next to the oldest of my sisters, rode in the wagon with the newly weds, south to the city limits, the groom throwing money to the children who followed. The young couple then paraded to the hotel. A sucession of parties were given in their honor which began at the hotel and then moved from house to house for a period of three days. Almost a year later, Anna Barbara was married to Konrad Meyer, October 12, 1857. She died 7 weeks later, December 5, 1857 at the age of twenty-two. My brother Johannes was one month old when he died.”

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Conversion of the Zollingers

I found a copy of my great-great-grandfather’s (Jacob Zollinger) life history and just loved reading it.  I was really impressed with his and his family’s faith in Jesus Christ and His restored church.  The Zollinger family was an established, well-to-do family in Urdorf, Switzerland for many, many, many years.  And they left it all behind to join their fellow saints in Salt Lake City.  They believed in Jesus Christ and knew His true church had been restored so they were baptized.

This is an excerpt describing their miraculous baptisms:

“During the summerof 1861 my father hired two carpenters to remodel our house. One of them, who considered himself a bible scholar, tried to persuade my parents to join his church but they were not to be moved. The town Minister who lived across the street from us had in his employ a young lady by the name of Mary Horlacher. Through her daily visits to our home for their supply of milk, Mary and our family, especially my sisters, became very good friends. Then one day Mary decided to quit her job and return to her home. Her parents, in her absence, had accepted the gospel and were baptised. The Minister, needing her services again, insisted on her coming back to work. In her old job again, Mary made use of every opportunity to share the knowledge of her new found religion with us.    My parents became interested. They began attending the meetings of the Elders in Zurich. Mother knew that this religion was much different than anything she had heard of. Their baptismal date was set for November 20, 1861. Ferdie and I were finishing the apple harvest that day when we noticed our parents walking along the public pathway that led in the direction of the Limmat River. Ferdie surmising what they were up to and being prejudiced against this new religion, began to swear and curse and threatened to stop them from going.    But the Lord blocked his way, for he met with an accident.

“It was the custom in those days for the farmers to help each other with the threshing of their grain. To keep it dry it was stacked in the barn. Ferdie was asked by a neighbor to come and help him. That eveninc while coming down a ladder, he slipped and fell injuring his leg. As a result he was confined to his bed for five or six weeks. Never did an opportunity to study and reflect on the teachings of Mormonism present itself in a better light than it did then. Ferdie was soon convinced of the truth and desired to be baptised.

“My parents, now members ofthe Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints, had in mind to sell the farm and home and emigrate to America. This would have been impossible had my brother Ferdie decided against joining the church. The Lord had his hand init and directed matters for the good of all.

“THE DAY OF MY BAPTISM – December 16, 1861

“In my early youth I cared little for religion.  My uppermost desire then was for enjoyment and that was only on Sundays when we boys got together. Since by brother Ferdie was laid up, it fell to my lot to look afterthe feeding of the stock and the milking. I was in the barn doing the farm chores when the Mormon Elders came to our house. My mother came out and said that Ferdie and my sister Dorothea, were going to be baptised andthat
she wanted me to go along too.    I said that there was plenty of time for me, but I did as I was told. That evening my mother invited the town officers and neighbors to a meeting. The officers were the only ones who came into the house. The other people stayed outside until the meeting was over. After the meeting we walked about a mile to the mill race onthe Limmat River. Ferdie walked with the aid of his crutches.  There was four inches of snow on the ground audit was cold One of the Elders went into the cold water, something I had never seen before. When Ferdie came out of the water he did not have any need for his crutches. He was healed and and walked as before. As for me, they never gave me any change of clothing, so I had to walk home in my wet clothes, but to my amazement, instead of freezing and being cold, I was not only warm but hot. So anybody can guess right there was the power of God made manifest, faith was planted in my heart and a real foundation was laid, I could not get away from it if I wanted to. I know it was the power of God. The baptisms and confirmations were performed by Elders Gerber and Miller. The next morning Ferdie loaded the wagon with 200 pound sacks of potatoes. The neighbors were astonished and wondered what had taken place, for the day before he was unable to walk without crutches.”

I am so thankful for these wonderful and faithful people who sacrificed a comfortable, well-established home and committed themselves to the gospel of Jesus Christ.  They knew they had the truth and their testimonies carried them to the Salt Lake Valley where they could be led by a living prophet of God and actively participate in the growth and establishment of the Lord’s kingdom on earth.

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